• 24 JUL 20
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    Week 5 Discussion 1 Response

     

    Please no plagiarism and make sure you are able to access all resource on your own before you bid. One of the references must come from Broderick and Blewitt (2015). I need this completed by 12/29/17 at 6pm. Respond to my colleagues using one or more of the following approaches:

    · Offer and support an additional factor that might have contributed to the immoral behaviors discussed by a colleague.

    · Expand on a colleague’s posting to describe how the described immoral behaviors might impact the future of the participating individual(s) and others.

    · Suggest additional interventions as appropriate. Support your suggestions with references to this week’s Learning Resources and the current literature.

     

    1. (A. Wit)

    Gender identity is typically established in children at a young age.  Due to the interaction of biological, social, and cultural influences, gender identity development may be different for all individuals.  In this post, I explore my gender identity development, and how that may have been different if I was born a male.

    How my development may have been different if I was born a boy

               Wow!  It is interesting to imagine how my development may have been different if I was born a male.  As the oldest child, I have felt some of the same pressures to perform that are stereotypically reserved for boys.  According to Cobb, Walsh, and Priest (2009), family-of-origin and same or opposite sex siblings can significantly influence gender identity.  As a first born, my father had expectations of academic and athletic success for me.  Had I been a boy, I may have readily accepted these challenges.  I have been successful in these areas, notwithstanding the anxiety and exhaustion of juggling multiple roles.  Cognitive-developmental theories suggest that once children have accepted their gender, they are eager to fulfill gender-appropriate expectations (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  As a young girl and even an adult, I have had guilty feelings for wanting to be a wife, homemaker, and mother.  My gender identity as a female defends my feminine desires.  As a boy, I expect I would have taken my “first-born” expectations very seriously.  Born male, perhaps I would have experienced greater athletic and career success with less guilt.

    How my gender identity constructs my current identity

               After reading through this week’s resources, I have a better understanding of biological and social influences on gender identity.  From birth, girls are given messages of what acceptable female traits are (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  For example, we dress baby girls in pink and handle them with delicacy (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  Biological differences extend far beyond the differences in genitalia (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). 

    Biological influences

    The genetic differences between males and females include genitalia, hormones, physical strength, and problem-solving skills (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  Sex hormones such as testosterone and estrogen can strengthen gender-affiliated behavior such as aggression in boys and emotional reactivity in girls (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  As a female, I can relate to hormonal stages that define my femininity like nesting before the birth of my children or premenstrual syndrome.

    Social influences

    As previously mentioned, siblings and birth-order are social influences that impact gender identity.  Firstborn siblings have more authority and take on responsibility roles (Wong, Branje, VanderValk, Hawk, & Meeus, 2010).  Domineering and responsibility for others are often considered “male” traits (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  Even though I may have taken on a few masculine/firstborn traits, my identity was largely formed by my mother and other girls.  Sex stereotypes influence children’s behavior as young as age 2 (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  My mother dressed my sister and I matching dresses that she and her sister wore as children.  I took ballet and figure skating lessons.  There is no question I understood my role as a girl, even if I had added expectations of a first-born. 

    Summary

               Gender identity development is a complex interplay of biological, social, and cultural factors.  Even though my identity as a girl was secure at a young age, I can see how I might have readily accepted masculine expectations if I were born a boy.  As a single mother of a son and two daughters, I am conflicted at times.  I wonder if I am providing enough “male” role-modeling for my children, or if that is even appropriate.  I see my children accepting their gender identity from an assortment of factors.  Although parents can significantly impact how children understand gender, biology and social influences must also be considered.

    References

    Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education

    Cobb, R. A., Walsh, C. E., & Priest, J. B. (2009). The cognitive-active gender role identification continuum. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 21(2),77–97.

    Wong, T., Branje, S., VanderValk, I., Hawk, S., & Meeus, W. (2010).  The role of siblings in identity development in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Journal of Adolescence, 33, 673-682.

    2. (H. Men)

    Gender identity is an extremely personal part of who we truly are, and also how we perceive and express ourselves in the world.  Normally during the gender identity stage, children are able to express themselves; they either declare themselves to be a boy or girl.  Most of a child’s gender identity is align with his or her biological sex.  However, for some of these children, the match between biological sex and gender identity might not be so clear to them.  Unfortunately, the society that we live in now does no longer think of the traditional way of living.  For example, young boys are being explored to toys that were purposely made for girls at one point life; and some young girls are now asking their parents to get the trucks and cars to play with instead of dolls.  Identifying myself as a heterosexual woman, I wonder how my development would have been if I was born a boy but identifies myself as a girl?  Cobb and Walsh (2009), indicated that gender refers to the psychological, social and cultural features and characteristics that have been strongly associated with the biological categories of male and female.  One of the major developmental differences in sex and puberty is the physical development.  These developmental processes include both primary and secondary sexual characteristics.  As also, indicated in Broderick and Blewitt (2015), primary sexual characteristics are ones that directly involved in reproduction; while secondary sexual characteristics are more related to the physical traits rather than reproduction, such as breast in females and deeper voices in males.  With that said, I believe that my behavior changes with puberty would have been different and I would have been in a very deep depression mode if I were to be a boy.  I also believe that my sexual orientation would have been different.  For example, instead of being heterosexual, I would most likely would have been homosexual. 

    Impact on Current Identity

    These differences would have definitely had a great impact on my current identity, if I was born a boy.  Sexual orientation is plays a major role in many people’s lives, does not really justify or define who they really are.  My psychological way of thinking certainly would have been different I was born a boy.  I’m the kind of person who is more logical and weigh out my options when I’m dealing with different situations in life.  Definitely, I’m sure my position in life right now would have been the same I were to be born a boy but probably would have been doing a more manly work. 

    Influences on Biological and Social

    In the regards to biological influence, they also play a role on sexual orientations.  Genetic play a very important role in people’s life.  “The biological perspective on childhood development states that children’s cognitive abilities, motor functions, personality and physical traits will develop in accordance with a biological design” (Kail & Zolner, 2015, pg. 3).  I also believe that my social influence would have been different because, I would have been pressure by society as a male to make certain decision that I may not want to. 

    Reference:

    Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

    Cobb, R. A., Walsh, C. E., & Priest, J. B. (2009). The cognitive-active gender role identification continuum. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 21(2),77–97.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    Kail, R., & Zolner, T. (2015). Children: A chronological approach (4th ed.). Don Mills, ON: Pearson Canada Inc.

    3. (B. Smi)

    I am excited to discuss this week’s topic as it’s something I discuss often with those around me, not gender in general – but how my life would be different if were born of the opposite sex. My understanding of gender and identity as always been as simple as the label you receive at birth, but I understand that the discussion of gender and identity has evolved so far beyond this way of thinking.

    If I Were A Boy

       I believe my development would have been different if I were a male in a number of ways. For example, young girls are often encouraged to entertain themselves with baby dolls, cooking sets, and play high heels. Boys, on the other hand, play with trucks, guns, or balls of some sort. In addition to this, young girls are always told to be seen and not heard while boys are able to be loud and rambunctious.  I noticed as my brother and I grew into our teen years, I took over most of the household chores while he was free to do whatever he chose. I would also be made to make his bed or change his sheets from time to time – to me, failing into the “susie homemaker “ stereotype.   

       I also believe my views on sex and sexual behavior would differ if I were a male. My mother has always stressed to me the importance of carrying myself as a lady, while never batting an eye at the multiple women my brother brought over to the basement never to be seen again. McCabe (2010) highlighted that women and men process their sexual interactions differently, with women indicating their participation in sex was for love while men report participating for pleasure. Research indicates there is also reported differences in sexual behaviors, sexual attitudes, the number of sexual partners, and sexual interest and drive. Socially, men are encouraged to be sexually free and open while women are virtually thrown away for such a thing.  

    How My Current Identity Would Be Impacted

        Currently, I take a lot of pride in the way I carry myself. However, I think I straddle the fence in regards to being an open book and being a prude – something I’ve been a called a time or two.  If I were a male, I think I’d have a few less morals, honestly speaking. My favorite aunt also expressed how she thought men had it easy and I’d have to say that I agree with her. She believed that men had it easy as they were raised by a mother, nurtured by girlfriends, and catered to by women. From this point of view, I think I would have to agree with my dear aunt. If the roles were reversed and I were a male, I doubt it would really matter how others viewed my sexual behaviors.

         Broderick (2015) reported that research has proven that women are more concerned with other’s needs and showing compassion when it comes to moral reasoning. Whereas, men are more concerned with justice and fairness. Because men have privilege over women, I’d likely be less compassionate as I would be accustomed to things leaning in my favor.  Socially, women are often placed at the bottom of the barrel and viewed as the inferior sex; this is especially true for women for color.  I think as a man, I might see greater success in some areas just for that reason alone. An example of this is one of my newest co-workers who comes from an insurance agency that was male-dominated. As we all know, work in the social service field is often predominately female. Needless, to say my new team member is struggling with the transition and has even expressed to me that he needed assistance in understanding “what certain things meant.” By this he meant, he was used to working with males who were straight and narrow, rarely expressing their emotions or speaking about things in code. He was also used to be authoritative. As a woman, I understand that we experience a lot of physical changes, changes in relationships, becoming parents and wives, caring for others, and a number of other things on top of working to support our families. So when someone erupts with emotions, I am more likely to be concerned were as a man would be more freaked out.  

    Biological and Social Influences

        As I previously mentioned, It is more socially acceptable for men to be aggressive and expressive of their emotions while women are expected to be the rock and hold it all together. “Traditionally, females are expected to be passive, emotional, self-sacrificing, and submissive within intimate relationships” (Cobb, 2009, pg. 82).  Traditional gender roles also categorize males as tough, stoic, and independent. I believe that my identity as it is due to my family’s choice to “follow” traditional gender roles. I cannot say whether this choice was intentional or just how they felt things should be done. However, I do believe upbringing has a large influence on the way a person views themselves and others. For example, my mother thought it imperative that I knew how to properly cook and clean and mentions to the date how important it will be when married.

    Summary

    An individual’s gender identity can be influenced by the labels they are exposed to and their family’s views on gender roles. Identity will likely also be impacted by social and biological influences. Expressing perspective and worldview from an opposing “side” was extremely interesting and provided some background for working with clients of the opposite sex. 

    References

    Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

    Cobb, R. A., Walsh, C. E., & Priest, J. B. (2009). The cognitive-active gender role identification continuum. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 21(2),77–97.

    McCabe, J., Tanner, A. E., & Heiman, J. R. (2010). The impact of gender expectations on meanings of sex and sexuality: Results from a cognitive interview study. Sex Roles, 62(3/4), 252–263.

      

    Readings

    · Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

    o Chapter 8, “Gender and Peer Relationships: Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence” (pp. 282-323)

    o Chapter 9, “Physical, Cognitive, and Identity Development in Adolescence” (pp. 324-367)

    Best, D. L. (2009). Another view of the gender-status relation. Sex Roles, 61(5/6),341–351.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    Cobb, R. A., Walsh, C. E., & Priest, J. B. (2009). The cognitive-active gender role identification continuum. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 21(2),77–97.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    Ewing Lee, E. A., & Troop-Gordon, W. (2011). Peer processes and gender role development: Changes in gender atypically related to negative peer treatment and children’s friendships. Sex Roles, 64(1/2),90–102.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    Gallor, S. M., & Fassinger, R. E. (2010). Social support, ethnic identity, and sexual identity of lesbians and gay men. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 22(3), 287–315.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    Lev, A. I. (2004). Transgender emergence: Therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Binghampton, NY: Routledge.

    o Chapter 3, “Deconstructing Sex and Gender: Thinking Outside the Box” (pp. 79–109)
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

    McCabe, J., Tanner, A. E., & Heiman, J. R. (2010). The impact of gender expectations on meanings of sex and sexuality: Results from a cognitive interview study. Sex Roles, 62(3/4), 252–263.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

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